Tuesday, August 25, 2009

How To Fast In A Healthy Way?

Everyone in the class asked me if i can fast or not and when i told them i can some were a surprised and wanted to see me fasting. As you all know, only 4 students in our group are non-Muslims ( 1 is Christian, 1 is Buddhist and 2 are Hindu) the rest are all Islam.

So since this month until the 20th day of September is the blessed day of
Ramadan. I would love to share these information to all our Muslims brothers and sisters on how to fast in a healthy way. Below you will some information and what you will do to stay healthy while fasting.

Accordingly, all experts agree that "breaking the fast" is the critical phase of fasting. While your body is in the resting mode, your stomach shrinks and your intestines become idle, so solid food must be re-introduced very slowly to avoid kidney failure or digestive distress. In fact, after a 40-day fast, you should make a careful transition for at least three days before returning to eating meats or fats or normal foods.

Further, if you end your fast gradually, the beneficial physical and spiritual effects will linger for days. But if you rush into solid foods, you may lose much of your deep sense of peace and experience physical problems such as diarrhea, sickness, fainting, and frankly even death in some cases, due to shock!

Observe these 7 ways on how to fast in a healthy way:

1. Eat the suhur meal.

The Prophet Muhammad highly recommend eating this pre-dawn meal before a day of fasting. While you may want to pass to catch some more sleep, remember that you can always take a catnap while you're fasting, but you won't be able to eat or drink. To make it easier, set out utensils and dry food on the table before going to bed so you can quickly eat and go back to sleep after suhur.

2. Limit your fat intake.

That's right, limit it--don't cut it out. Otherwise you'll have to get rid of what's considered "traditional" iftar food in most Muslim cultures. If you're not sure what kind of food is being referred to, think fried, greasy and/or super sweet.

3. Follow the Prophet's golden rule of one-third.

This especially needs to be said in Ramadan. We should strive to have no more than one-third food, one-third liquid and one-third air in our stomachs when eating.

4. Encourage dip-dunking.

Fruits and vegetables get left to the wayside during regular days, let alone at iftar (the fast-breaking meal) time. But you can whip out those carrot sticks if you've got some tasty dips to eat them with. Check out some healthy recipes.

5. Walk after iftar.

Before you fall over from exhaustion after iftar and dinner, take a short walk around the block or just around your building. The change of environment and exposure to fresh air may just wake you up in time to go for the next activity listed below.

6. Pray tarawih (special evening prayers during Ramadan).

This is more great exercise, not to mention a wonderful way to build concentration, stamina and brotherhood/sisterhood.

7. Take a short afternoon nap.

Experts say you don't need more than a 15-minute siesta to really refresh you. During lunch hour, find a quiet spot, set the alarm on your watch or cell phone and nap. This can help your body adjust to the daily Ramadan schedule that requires waking up early for the suhur meal.

In terms of resuming any sort of exercise routine, the advice is the same. Start out slowly, allowing time for your body to re-adjust to its usual regime.
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Monday, August 24, 2009

What Is Ramadan?

To all our Muslim's brothers and sisters, from the 22nd day of August to 2oth day of September is the holy month of Ramadan.

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calendar. Every day during this month, Muslims around the world spend the daylight hours in a complete fast. Which means abstaining from food, drink, and other physical needs during the daylight hours. As a time to purify the soul, refocus attention on God, and practice self-sacrifice. Ramadan is much more than just not eating and drinking.

Muslims are called upon to use this month to re-evaluate their lives in light of Islamic guidance. We are to make peace with those who have wronged us, strengthen ties with family and friends, do away with bad habits -- essentially to clean up our lives, our thoughts, and our feelings. The Arabic word for "fasting" (sawm) literally means "to refrain" - and it means not only refraining from food and drink, but from evil actions, thoughts, and words.

Every part of the body must be restrained. The tongue must be restrained from backbiting and gossip. The eyes must restrain themselves from looking at unlawful things. The hand must not touch or take anything that does not belong to it. The ears must refrain from listening to idle talk or obscene words. The feet must refrain from going to sinful places. In such a way, every part of the body observes the fast. Therefore, fasting is not merely physical, but is rather the total commitment of the person's body and soul to the spirit of the fast. Ramadan is a time to practice self-restraint; a time to cleanse the body and soul from impurities and re-focus one's self on the worship of God.
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Friday, August 14, 2009

Why Is Communication Important In Nursing?

Today we are given an assignment on "Why Communication In Nursing Is Important?". So i would love to share these with you.

We are always communicating, whether we’re speaking or not. A well-known UCLA study found that only around 7% of the meaning of spoken communication came from words alone, 55% came from facial expression and 38% came from the way the words were said.

Effective communication has many aspects. It is, for example, respectful, assertive, empathetic, clear, attentive, honest and non-judgmental.Effective communication is fundamental to nursing practice. It is a skill that can be learned and continually improved. Improvement requires keen observation, the willingness to be reflective, and the commitment to listen and learn.

What is communication in nursing?
Many definitions describe communication as a transfer of information between a source and a receiver. In nursing, communication is a sharing of health-related information between a patient and a nurse, with both participants as sources and receivers. The information may be verbal or nonverbal, written or spoken, personal or impersonal, issue-specific, or even relationship-oriented, to name a few possibilities.

Why is good communication important?
The power of creative and effective nursing care is strengthened by good communication skills. Patients share their stories, symptoms, and concerns by talking with us. Both the spoken word and the body language convey information about the patient’s experience.

Your words can do so much: put a patient at ease, set up a productive relationship, and carry out interventions. There is no other skill that is used more in nursing than communication.

Here’s a short quiz from Psychology Today to give you a quick assessment of your communication skills:
Communication skills test.
Read more >>

Why Communication In Nursing Is Important?

Today we are given an assignment on "Why communication in nursing is important?". So i would love to share these to you.

We are always communicating, whether we’re speaking or not. A well-known UCLA study found that only around 7% of the meaning of spoken communication came from words alone, 55% came from facial expression and 38% came from the way the words were said.

Effective communication has many aspects. It is, for example, respectful, assertive, empathetic, clear, attentive, honest and non-judgmental.

Effective communication is fundamental to nursing practice. It is a skill that can be learned and continually improved. Improvement requires keen observation, the willingness to be reflective, and the commitment to listen and learn.

What is communication in nursing?
Many definitions describe communication as a transfer of information between a source and a receiver. In nursing, communication is a sharing of health-related information between a patient and a nurse, with both participants as sources and receivers. The information may be verbal or nonverbal, written or spoken, personal or impersonal, issue-specific, or even relationship-oriented, to name a few possibilities.
Why is good communication important?
The power of creative and effective nursing care is strengthened by good communication skills. Patients share their stories, symptoms, and concerns by talking with us. Both the spoken word and the body language convey information about the patient’s experience.
Your words can do so much: put a patient at ease, set up a productive relationship, and carry out interventions. There is no other skill that is used more in nursing than communication.
Here’s a short quiz from Psychology Today to give you a quick assessment of your communication skills: Communication skills test.
Read more >>

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Great Relief For Mandarin Class

2:59 PM by sarah · 1 comments
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Yesterday all of us were relieved upon hearing the announcement of Miss Jenny that she won't be giving us an examination for her subject Mandarin language. Wow! We found it very difficult - the chinese characters and its pronunciation as well.
The purpose of learning Mandarin is for us to have a basic background of the language so that we will be able to communicate with our Chinese patients who can not speak both Bahasa Malayu and English.
She said we wont be able to pass if she will give exams since it will take several months to years to fully understand and learn how to read and write with the Chinese characters with its pinging.
Anyway thanks a lot and i could sleep soundly without thingking of Mandarin exams.
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Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Are Vaccines Ready For A(H1N1)?

2:58 PM by sarah · 1 comments
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Vaccines are not ready yet for A(H1N1) but work is well under way to develop such a vaccine. Making new influenza vaccines ready to immunize people generally takes five to six months after first identification of the pandemic virus. The pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus was identified at the end of April 2009.

How quickly will pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccines be available for use?
The very first doses of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine usable to immunize people, from one or more manufacturers, are expected as early as September 2009.

What implications does the declaration of a pandemic (phase 6) have on influenza vaccine production?
When the WHO Director-General declared the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic on 11 June 2009, she noted that production of seasonal influenza vaccines would be completed soon and that full industrial production capacity would then be available to ensure the largest possible supply of pandemic vaccine in the months to come.

Which manufacturers will make pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccines?
There are currently around twenty vaccine manufacturers with licenses to produce seasonal influenza vaccines. There are other qualified vaccine manufacturers who are preparing to make influenza A (H1N1) vaccine, but do not yet have a licensed seasonal influenza vaccine.

What is the global manufacturing capacity for a potential influenza A (H1N1) pandemic vaccine?
Based on a global survey made by WHO on 15 May 2009, a maximum of 4.9 billion doses potentially could be produced in 12 months, but only if several assumptions are met. First, full global manufacturing capacity is devoted to this production. Second, production yields for influenza A (H1N1) vaccine are similar to those usually obtained for seasonal vaccines. Third, each manufacturer uses the vaccine formulation that is most "dose-sparing" (i.e. using a smaller quantity of active principle). A more conservative estimate of global capacity is at least 1 to 2 billion doses per year. The numbers of persons who might be vaccinated will not be known until it is determined whether one or two doses of the vaccine will be needed to achieve protection.

What technologies will be used to grow pandemic influenza A (H1N1) viruses to make vaccines?
Most of these vaccines will be produced using chicken eggs, while a few manufacturers are using cell culture technology for vaccine production.

How is the production capacity for influenza vaccines distributed geographically?
Around 70% of the global seasonal influenza vaccine production capacity today is located in Europe and North America, with further significant manufacturing capacity in Australia, Japan and China. During the past three years, six manufacturers in developing countries have begun to acquire the technology to produce influenza vaccines and have received technical and financial support from WHO. Since May 2009, five additional new producers have joined this initiative.

Will there be enough pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine for everyone?
When pandemic vaccine first becomes available, it is anticipated that the demand will be greater than the supply. This gap will narrow as more vaccine becomes available over time.

Who will receive priority for vaccination?
WHO is working with the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization and partners on the options for deciding in which target groups vaccination should begin first. At its July 7 meeting, SAGE recommended that health care workers worldwide should be immunized as a first priority (see: Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 briefing note 2 below). Ultimately, national authorities will identify priority groups for vaccination based on circumstances within the country.

Will developing countries have access to pandemic influenza vaccines?
The WHO Director-General has called for international solidarity to provide fair and equitable access for all countries to pandemic vaccine when it becomes available. WHO has requested that manufacturers set aside future influenza A (H1N1) vaccines for developing country populations, through donations or affordable pricing arrangements.
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What Shall I Do With A(H1N1)

What can I do to protect myself from catching influenza A(H1N1)?
The main route of transmission of the new influenza A(H1N1) virus seems to be similar to seasonal influenza, via droplets that are expelled by speaking, sneezing or coughing. You can prevent getting infected by avoiding close contact with people who show influenza-like symptoms (trying to maintain a distance of about 1 metre if possible) and taking the following measures:
  • avoid touching your mouth and nose;
  • clean hands thoroughly with soap and water, or cleanse them with an alcohol-based hand rub on a regular basis (especially if touching the mouth and nose, or surfaces that are potentially contaminated);
  • avoid close contact with people who might be ill;
  • reduce the time spent in crowded settings if possible;
  • improve airflow in your living space by opening windows;
  • practise good health habits including adequate sleep, eating nutritious food, and keeping physically active.

What about using a mask? What does WHO recommend?
If you are not sick you do not have to wear a mask. If you are caring for a sick person, you can wear a mask when you are in close contact with the ill person and dispose of it immediately after contact, and cleanse your hands thoroughly afterwards. If you are sick and must travel or be around others, cover your mouth and nose. Using a mask correctly in all situations is essential. Incorrect use actually increases the chance of spreading infection.

How do I know if I have influenza A(H1N1)?
You will not be able to tell the difference between seasonal flu and influenza A(H1N1) without medical help. Typical symptoms to watch for are similar to seasonal viruses and include fever, cough, headache, body aches, sore throat and runny nose. Only your medical practitioner and local health authority can confirm a case of influenza A(H1N1).

What should I do if I think I have the illness?
If you feel unwell, have high fever, cough or sore throat:

  • stay at home and keep away from work, school or crowds;
  • rest and take plenty of fluids;
  • cover your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing and, if using tissues, make sure you dispose of them carefully.
  • Clean your hands immediately after with soap and water or cleanse them with an alcohol-based hand rub;
  • if you do not have a tissue close by when you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth as much as possible with the crook of your elbow;
  • use a mask to help you contain the spread of droplets when you are around others, but be sure to do so correctly;
  • inform family and friends about your illness and try to avoid contact with other people;
  • If possible, contact a health professional before traveling to a health facility to discuss whether a medical examination is necessary.

Should I take an antiviral now just in case I catch the new virus?
No. You should only take an antiviral, such as oseltamivir or zanamivir, if your health care provider advises you to do so. Individuals should not buy medicines to prevent or fight this new influenza without a prescription, and they should exercise caution in buying antivirals over the Internet.

What about breastfeeding? Should I stop if I am ill?
No, not unless your health care provider advises it. Studies on other influenza infections show that breastfeeding is most likely protective for babies - it passes on helpful maternal immunities and lowers the risk of respiratory disease. Breastfeeding provides the best overall nutrition for babies and increases their defense factors to fight illness.

When should someone seek medical care?
A person should seek medical care if they experience shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, or if a fever continues more than three days. For parents with a young child who is ill, seek medical care if a child has fast or labored breathing, continuing fever or convulsions (seizures).

Supportive care at home - resting, drinking plenty of fluids and using a pain reliever for aches - is adequate for recovery in most cases. (A non-aspirin pain reliever should be used by children and young adults because of the risk of Reye's syndrome.)

Should I go to work if I have the flu but am feeling OK?
No. Whether you have influenza A(H1N1) or a seasonal influenza, you should stay home and away from work through the duration of your symptoms. This is a precaution that can protect your work colleagues and others.

Can I travel?
If you are feeling unwell or have symptoms of influenza, you should not travel. If you have any doubts about your health, you should check with your health care provider.

Is it safe to travel?
Yes. WHO is not recommending travel restrictions related to the outbreak of the influenza A(H1N1) virus. Today, global travel is commonplace and large numbers of people move around the world for business and leisure. Limiting travel and imposing travel restrictions would have very little effect on stopping the virus from spreading, but would be highly disruptive to the global community.

Influenza A(H1N1) has already been confirmed in many parts of the world. The global response now focuses on minimizing the impact of the virus through the rapid identification of cases, and providing patients with appropriate medical care, rather than on stopping its spread internationally.

Although identifying signs and symptoms of influenza in travellers can help track the path of the outbreak, it will not reduce the spread of influenza, as the virus can be transmitted from person to person before the onset of symptoms.

Scientific research based on mathematical modelling shows that restricting travel would be of limited or no benefit in stopping the spread of disease. Historical records of previous influenza pandemics, as well as experience with SARS, validate this.

Does WHO recommend screenings at country entry and exit points to detect if ill people are travelling?
No. We do not believe entry and exit screenings would work to reduce the spread of this disease. However country-level measures to respond to a public health risk are the decision of national authorities, under the International Health Regulations 2005.

Countries that adopt measures that significantly interfere with international traffic (e.g. delaying an airplane passenger for more than 24 hours, or refusing country entry or departure to a traveller) must provide WHO with the public health reasoning and evidence for their actions. WHO will follow up with all of its Member countries on such matters.

Travellers should always be treated with dignity and respect for their human rights.

How can I protect myself from influenza A(H1N1) when I am travelling?
People who are ill should delay travel plans. Returning travellers who become ill should contact their health care provider.

Travellers can protect themselves and others by following simple prevention practices that apply while travelling and in daily life.

Are some people more at risk?
More study is needed to determine if some populations (i.e. younger or older people, or people with other medical conditions) could be affected by the outbreak, of if they are at higher risk for severe illness. WHO recommends that everyone take precautions to prevent the spread of infection.

Are there any special recommendations for pregnant women?
Yes, they are vulnerable. Like everyone, they should take all the necessary precautions.

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A (H1N1) Frequently Asked Questions - Part 1

The spread of A (H1N1) are already getting crazy. A lot of people are dying each day. In Malaysia alone there are already 38 death cases with a total number of 2,253 cases as of August 11, 2009 and still counting and few victims are children ages under 10 years old.

So it is high time for us to be vigilant and be cautious of our health and our environment. Below you will find Frequently Asked Questions on A(H1N1) hoping to eradicate and reduce the pandemic.

What is the new influenza A(H1N1)?
This is a new influenza A(H1N1) virus that has never before circulated among humans. This virus is not related to previous or current human seasonal influenza viruses. This pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus was identified at the end of April 2009.

How do people become infected with the virus?
The virus is spread from person-to-person. It is transmitted as easily as the normal seasonal flu and can be passed to other people by exposure to infected droplets expelled by coughing or sneezing that can be inhaled, or that can contaminate hands or surfaces.

To prevent spread, people who are ill should cover their mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, stay home when they are unwell, clean their hands regularly, and keep some distance from healthy people, as much as possible.

There are no known instances of people getting infected by exposure to pigs or other animals.

The place of origin of the virus is unknown.

What are the signs and symptoms of infection?
Signs of influenza A(H1N1) are flu-like, including fever, cough, headache, muscle and joint pain, sore throat and runny nose, and sometimes vomiting and diarrhoea.

Why are we so worried about this flu when hundreds of thousands die every year from seasonal epidemics?
Seasonal influenza occurs every year and the viruses change each year - but many people have some immunity to the circulating virus which helps limit infections. Some countries also use seasonal influenza vaccines to reduce illness and deaths.

But influenza A(H1N1) is a new virus and one to which most people have no or little immunity and, therefore, this virus could cause more infections than are seen with seasonal flu. WHO is working closely with manufacturers to expedite the development of a safe and effective vaccine but it will be some months before it is available.

The new influenza A(H1N1) appears to be as contagious as seasonal influenza, and is spreading fast particularly among young people (from ages 10 to 45). The severity of the disease ranges from very mild symptoms to severe illnesses that can result in death. The majority of people who contract the virus experience the milder disease and recover without antiviral treatment or medical care. Of the more serious cases, more than half of hospitalized people had underlying health conditions or weak immune systems.

Most eople experience mild illness and recover at home. When should someone seek medical care?
A person should seek medical care if they experience shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, or if a fever continues more than three days. For parents with a young child who is ill, seek medical care if a child has fast or labored breathing, continuing fever or convulsions (seizures).Supportive care at home - resting, drinking plenty of fluids and using a pain reliever for aches - is adequate for recovery in most cases. (A non-aspirin pain reliever should be used by children and young adults because of the risk of Reye's syndrome.)

Is it safe to eat pork and pork products?

Yes. influenza A(H1N1) has not been shown to be transmissible to people through eating properly handled and prepared pork (pig meat) or other products derived from pigs. The influenza A(H1N1) virus is killed by cooking temperatures of 160°F/70°C, corresponding to the general guidance for the preparation of pork and other meat.
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Monday, August 10, 2009

How To Improve Your Memory

4:56 PM by sarah · 2 comments
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As i am back to school, my most concern is my memory! Considering the fact that i had undergone caesarian operation and they said that anesthetic will affects your memory or decrease your memory. Maybe its true because i tends to forget a lot of things or i am just disorganize. However, because i want the best for my studies and dont want to fail as much as possible. I gather few information here and would love to share it with you. This is beneficial to those people who are poor in memory and or those who would love to improve their memory as well.

Here are ways that can help you improve your memory:

Use triggers, links, better known as mnemonics. Associate memories with stimuli, such as images, sounds, smells, touch, tastes, languages, emotions, etc. Make your triggers positive, as your memory tends to block negative images, exaggerate its size and importance, incorporate humor, view it all in vivid 3 dimensional colors, and use symbols to help recall more complex messages.

Intend to memorize it. Our memory is at its best when we WANT to memorize, and when we have a strong motivation to memorize. Ever read a text, then a minute later not remember it? Probably because you weren't that interested in it in the first place. To remember it, you have to WANT to remember it.

Learn to visualize your thoughts. Your brain can think in terms of words and in terms of images. Therefore, when memorizing an item, learn to recall it in ways that you can explain it, and in ways that you can see it.

Speak out loud! When you recite something or read something out loud, it brings more attention and motivation to it, which will help you remember it better. As well, the adding of another sense (sound) helps with memorization.

Eat the right food. Fiber and vitamin C rich foods such as cantaloupe, blueberries, asparagus, and sweet potatoes can help enhance your memory. Foods containing beta carotene, such as red foods, help with memory as well. Some of these foods are watermelon, strawberries, tomatoes, cherries, and radishes.

Use technology to your advantage. Although technology is a reason that our existence is inflicted with so much information, and thus test our memory like never before, it can also be a very useful tool to help with your memory. Use organizers, day planners, computers, alarm clocks, and the likes to help you recall and remember things that you would normally not.

more information....next posting
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